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Deferred Action Requirements

Posted: August 7th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

Sarasota Immigration Attorney Victoria Jaensch Karins

Immigration Attorney Victoria Jaensch Karins offers answers to questions concerning the new Deferred Action policy.

As the date of implementation of the new deferred action policy draws near more details about requirements for the application are being released. I recently returned from a meeting concerning the requirements for  Deferred Action and wanted to share information from that meeting. There are still some questions and as we learn more we will add it to the blog. In the meantime, readers can go to www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals to find out more.

 Q: When will USCIS begin accepting applications for Deferred Action?

  • August 15, 2012.

Q: What will a Deferred Action applicant need to demonstrate?

  1. Applicant under age 31 as of 6/15/2012.
  2. Came to US before age 16.
  3. Continuous residence as of 6/15/2007 for 5 years and physical presence at time of filing.
  4. Entered without inspection or status expired prior to 6/15/ 2012.
  5. Currently enrolled in school, high school diploma, GED, or honorable discharge from military.
  6. Enrollment in school or GED can be after 6/15/2012 so long as it is as of date of filing
  7. Not convicted of felony, significant misdemeanor or 3 or more misdemeanors.

Q: How old can I be to apply?

  • Applicants must be over 15 to file unless in removal.

Q: Does significant misdemeanor include a DUI?

  • Yes.

Q: If I apply and am denied, will I be in danger of deportation?

  • No. Information on the application (including information on family members) will not be disclosed to ICE or CBP for removal purposes – in other words, applicants and their family members will not be placed in removal just because they apply and are denied for some reason. However, they will exercise prosecutorial discretion where there are issues of national security, criminal offenses, etc.

Q: What will the cost of applying be?

  • Total fee will be $465

Q: Can the fee be waived?

  • No fee waivers but there are fee exemptions for certain situations. Fee exemption must be requested prior to applying for Deferred Action (but not prior to 8/15)

Q: Will I need to get my fingerprints taken?

  • Yes, applicants will have to get biometrics.

Q: Will there be an interview?

  • There will be no interview, except in some cases were fraud may be indicated or for quality control purposes.

Q: If I apply and am denied can I appeal?

  • There will be no review or appeal of denials.

Q: Can I apply for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) at the same time?

  • EADs can be applied for at the same time as Deferred Action and will be granted also for two years. Must show economic need

Q: Can I renew my Deferred Action status?

  • Renewals of Deferred Action and Employment Authorization Documents will be available in two year increments

See these other articles for more information:

  1. “USCIS Aceptará Solicitudes Para Acción Diferida el 15 de Agosto”
  2. “Deferred Action Applicants Should Collect Student Records Now
  3. “Sarasota Immigration Attorneys Welcome Deferred Action Announcement”

USCIS Aceptara Solicitudes Para Accion Diferida el 15 de Agosto

Posted: August 3rd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments »

WASHINGTON-El Departamento de Seguridad Nacional ha ofrecido hoy información adicional sobre el proceso de acción diferida en preparación del 15 de agosto; la fecha de implementacion de la nueva politica.

El 15 de junio, la secretaria de Seguridad Nacional, Janet Napolitano, anunció que ciertas personas jóvenes que llegaron a los Estados Unidos cuando eran niños y que cumplen con otros requisitos claves pueden ser elegibles para la Acción Diferida. United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) está finalizando un proceso por el cual los individuos potencialmente elegibles podrán solicitar la Acción Diferida.

USCIS espera que todos los formularios, instrucciones y la información adicional pertinente a la Acción Diferida estara disponible el 15 de agosto de 2012. USCIS entonces de inmediato comenzará a aceptar solicitudes para el examen de la acción diferida para quienes llegaron a los Estados Unidos como infantes.

Los aspectos más destacados de la información compartida durante la conferencia de hoy incluyen lo siguiente:

  • Aquellos que llegaron durante la infancia que estan en el proceso de expulsión, con órdenes finales y los que nunca han estado en proceso de deportación podrán solicitar afirmativamente la Acción Diferida con el USCIS.
  • Los solicitantes utilizaran un formulario especifico para Accion Diferida.
  • Los solicitantes pueden enviar por correo su solicitud de acción diferida junto con una solicitud de un permiso de trabajo y todas las tasas aplicables a la caja de seguridad del USCIS.
  • Todos los solicitantes deben proporcionar datos biométricos y someterse a un examen de antecedentes criminales.
  • Los cuatro Centros de Servicio de USCIS revisarán las solicitudes. El establecimiento mas cercano esta en Tampa.

USCIS Will Begin Accepting Deferred Action Applications on August 15th

Posted: August 3rd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , | 3 Comments »

From USCIS.gov

DHS Outlines Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Process

USCIS to begin accepting requests for consideration of deferred action on August 15, 2012

released Aug. 3, 2012

English: Seal of the United States Department ...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

WASHINGTON—The Department of Homeland Security today provided additional information on the deferred action for childhood arrivals process during a national media call in preparation for the August 15 implementation date.

On June 15, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano announced that certain young people who came to the United States as children and meet other key guidelines may be eligible, on a case-by-case basis, to receive deferred action.  U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is finalizing a process by which potentially eligible individuals may request consideration of deferred action for childhood arrivals.

English: The logo of U.S. Citizenship and Immi...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

USCIS expects to make all forms, instructions, and additional information relevant to the deferred action for childhood arrivals process available on August 15, 2012. USCIS will then immediately begin accepting requests for consideration of deferred action for childhood arrivals.

Information shared during today’s call includes the following highlights:

  • Requestors – those in removal proceedings, those with final orders, and those who have never been in removal proceedings – will be able to affirmatively request consideration of deferred action for childhood arrivals with USCIS.
  • Requestors will use a form developed for this specific purpose.
  • Requestors will mail their deferred action request together with an application for an employment authorization document and all applicable fees to the USCIS lockbox.
  • All requestors must provide biometrics and undergo background checks.
  • Fee waivers cannot be requested for the application for employment authorization and biometric collection. However, fee exemptions will be available in limited circumstances.
  • The four USCIS Service Centers will review requests.

Additional information regarding the Secretary’s June 15 announcement will be made available here on August 15, 2012. It is important to note that this process is not yet in effect and individuals who believe they meet the guidelines of this new process should not request consideration of deferred action before August 15, 2012. Requests submitted before August 15, 2012 will be rejected. Individuals who believe they are eligible should be aware of immigration scams. Unauthorized practitioners of immigration law may try to take advantage of you by charging a fee to submit forms to USCIS on your behalf.


Acción Diferida – Que son los requisitos?

Posted: July 13th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments »

Estos consejos proceden de UnidosNow, organización pro-inmigración de Sarasota.

OJO: Todavia no se sabe como va a ser el proceso para solicitar Acción Diferida. No se debe contratar a ningún “notario” que dice que puede entregar la solicitud para usted, esta mintiendo.

Aun asi, hay cosas que se puede hacer hoy para prepararse a solicitar accion diferida. Uno es sacar el Registro Escolar.

Parte del papeleo requerido para solicitar la accion diferida es el registro escolare.  Esto sirve para demostrar que usted o su hijo ha asistido a una escuela publica durante los ultimos años lo que ayudara a demostrar que usted ha residido en este pais.

Personas autorizadas para solicitar registros escolares:

  1. Padres de estudiantes de una escuela del condado de Sarasota
  2. Estudiantes ya graduados de una escuela del condado de Sarasota

Para los Padres

  1. Ustedes tienen que completar la “Solicitud de Registro del Estudiante”/”Request for Student Record” y marcar “transcript” y “attendance.”
  2. Usted puede enviar la solicitud por correo, fax o entregarla a la escuela a que asistira su hijo en el ano 2012-2013. Ojo, las escuelas primarias no tienen registros de estudiantes ya en secundaria. El registro acumulativo de cada estudiante se mueve con el estudiante de una escuela a otra.

Para los ex-estudiantes de una escuela del condado de Sarasota

  1. Si usted ya se graduo de una escuela del condado de Sarasota, tendra que completar la misma “Solicitud de Registro del Estudiante” pero, un su caso, hay que marcar “transcript,” “graduation verification,” y “attendance,” como los registros que se solicite.
  2. Luego tendra que enviar por correo, fax o entregar el formulario al “Centro de Retencion de Registros”/”Register Retention Center” en Osprey.

Las escuelas secundarias y el Centro de Retención de Registros solo estan abiertos entre lunes y jueves durante el mes de julio. Todas las asociaciones escolares de Sarasota estan cerradas los viernes durante el verano. Les recomiendo que soliciten su registro este mes. Puede haber numerosas solicitudes y las escuelas estarán muy ocupadas en el mes de agosto cuando el ano escolar empiece.  Los documentos serán procesados de forma gratuita.

Otros documentos recomendados para el proceso de accion diferida:

  • Cartas de aceptacion de una universidad
  • Becas y premios obtenidos
  • Records de trabajo voluntario, actividades extracurriculares y deportivas
  • Cartas de apoyo de un maestro, empleadores, amigos, etc
  • Los certificados de nacimiento de los niños

Para mas información sobre Acción Diferida vea:

  1. “USCIS Aceptará Solicitudes Para Acción Diferida el 15 de Agosto”
  2. “Deferred Action Applicants Should Collect Student Records Now”
  3. “Abogados de Jaensch Immigration Law Firm Reciben con Aprobación el Anuncio de Acción Diferida”

ABOGADOS DE JAENSCH IMMIGRATION LAW FIRM RECIBEN CON APROBACIÓN EL ANUNCIO DE ACCIÓN DIFERIDA,

Posted: July 12th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

ADVIERTEN AL PÚBLICO DE FRAUDE POR “NOTARIOS”

Sarasota, FL – Abogados de Jaensch Immigration Law Firm recibieron con aprobación el anuncio reciente de la administración del Presidente Obama que inmigrantes jóvenes serán elegibles para solicitar “Acción Diferida” y la autorización de empleo. La política concederá a inmigrantes que son elegibles la oportunidad de vivir sin el miedo de ser deportado, y también les permitirá trabajar legalmente. Este anuncio lleva esperanza a inmigrantes y sus familias. Sin embargo, no es un arregló permanente, ni concede estatus legal permanente a ninguna persona.

Para ser elegible, un individuo tendrá que demonstrar que:

  • vino a los Estados Unidos siendo menor de dieciséis años de edad;
  • ha residido ininterrumpidamente en los Estados Unidos durante al menos cinco años antes de la fecha de este memorándum y está presente en los Estados Unidos en la fecha de este memorándum;
  • está asistiendo actualmente a la escuela, se ha graduado de la enseñanza secundaria, ha obtenido un certificado de desarrollo de educación general, o es un veterano que ha sido dado de alta con honores de los Guardacostas o las Fuerzas Armadas de los Estados Unidos;
  • no ha sido condenado por un delito mayor, un delito menor significativo, múltiples delitos menores ni representa una amenaza para la seguridad nacional o la seguridad pública;
  • no es mayor de treinta años de edad.

La acción diferida será disponible a individuos con casos en Corte de Inmigración, y también a individuos que solicitan el beneficio directamente con el Departamento de Inmigración.

La administración aun no está aceptando solicitudes para esta acción. En un plazo de sesenta días – en agosto – se espera que la administración de consejo e información sobre el proceso de solicitud para acción diferida y la autorización de empleo.

Si Usted no está en proceso de repatriación, NO solicite acción diferida en este momento. ¡Ojo con el fraude! Desafortunadamente, esta política puede abrir la puerta al fraude y decepción por “notarios.” En los Estados Unidos, los notarios no tienen la educación legal ni pueden actuar como abogado. Cualquier persona que dice que ya tiene la solicitud por acción diferida o que le pide honorarios para llenar una solicitud lo quiere estafar. El proceso para solicitar este beneficio no comienza hasta que sea anunciado por el gobierno federal. Su caso puede ser retrasado por causa de un notario, resultando en castigos, hasta deportación.

“¡Ten cuidado! No se ponga en peligro de ser descalificado por esta acción,” dijo Victoria Jeansch, una de los abogados de Jaensch Immigration Law Firm. “Asegúrase de que Usted hable con un abogado autorizado quien puede ayudarle con la solicitud y garantizar que Usted tiene la mejor posibilidad de beneficiarse de esta acción.”

Para más información, póngase en contacto con Jaensch Immigration Law Firm (941) 366-9841. Para más información sobre el anuncio, visite a www.aila.org/dream. También puede visitar www.ailalawyer.com para encontrar un abogado autorizado en su área.


Come out Tonight to the UnidosNow Forum on Deferred Action

Posted: July 12th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

A representative from Jaensch Immigration Law Firm will be speaking at the event as well as many other local immigration experts.  Tonight from 7-8pm at 1750 17th St.

UnidosNow Deferred Action Forum Flyer


Deferred Action Applicants Should Collect Student Records Now

Posted: July 12th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment »

Local Hispanic Community Organizer, UnidosNow, Advises Potential Deferred Action Applicants to Begin Collecting Student Records Immediately

In lieu of the June 15, 2012 immigration policy, parents and students who need student records will need to complete a “Student Record Request” (mark transcript and attendance-item 2). If your child is currently a student of a Sarasota County public school you may mail, fax or deliver the mentioned form to the 2012-2013 school. Elementary schools will not have the information for high school students. The cumulative file of each student “moves” with the student from school to school.

If you are a student who graduated from a Sarasota County School, please complete the “Student Record Request” , mark transcript, graduation verification and attendance as the records you are requesting. Mail, fax or deliver the form to the School Board of Sarasota County “Record Retention Center” at Osprey. The contact information is included in the form.

You may also access the student records request online here. Only high schools and the Record Retention Center might be opened in July from Monday through Thursday. All Sarasota School Board facilities are closed on Fridays during the summer months. There might be numerous requests for these documents and schools will be very busy in August with the new school year. I encourage you to process this request during the month of July. The documents will be processed free of charge.

Other documents for favorable use of discretion:

  • College acceptance letters
  • Scholarships/awards won
  • Volunteer work, extracurricular activities and sports
  • Letters of support from teachers, employers, friends, etc
  • Birth certificates of children

The attorneys at Jaensch Immigration Law Firm can assist with record requests for its deferred action clients.

For more information check out:


More Deferred Action Announcement Q&A

Posted: June 26th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

There are thousands of people who will benefit from the new Deferred Action policy. Until the regulations and rules regarding the program are released in 60 days or so, we urge you to use this time to collect documents that will help prepare your case.

DO NOT apply without getting your criminal history (including juvenile delinquency adjudications) reviewed FIRST.  The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will conduct background checks, collect information from local law enforcement, and examine your criminal history, including arrest records and criminal warrants.  You risk having DHS and/or ICE detain and deport you, if you apply for deferred action without having your criminal history reviewed.

We do not know what kind of criminal history could bar you from the deferred action program announced by Obama last week. We know that convictions for a felony, a significant misdemeanor or three or more misdemeanors are bars to the program. Moreover, a person who immigration authorities consider a “public safety threat” or a “national security threat” will be barred.

What is a “significant misdemeanor”?

This is an unclear phrase. According to recent documents released by the government, it appears it will include offenses such as driving under the influence, possession of a controlled substance (e.g. marijuana), obstruction of justice, assault and theft. Many of these crimes can subject you to mandatory detention. Do not assume that your misdemeanor conviction is not a serious misdemeanor.

What could count as a “public safety threat”?

We do not know. It could be that officials will look behind dismissed charges or juvenile delinquency adjudications to determine whether a person presents a public safety threat.  Juvenile delinquency adjudications any connections with gang activity or any action where the police stopped you and asked questions about gangs or gang membership any arrest or dismissed charge.

What could count as a “national security threat”?

We do not know. DHS broadly characterizes “participation in activities that threaten the United States” as a national security threat. This means it will not be limited to criminal convictions.

What should I do?

1. Get a copy of your record from whatever court your case was heard, including all juvenile delinquency adjudications. Try to get copies of police reports, a criminal history background check, or your “rap sheet.” Many states already have systems for you to collect your criminal history.  In many cases, you can find it on your local county website or state government websites. Make sure you get them from all states where you believe you may have been arrested or convicted.

2. Meet with a nonprofit organization, an immigration attorney or advocate experienced in deportation defense or the immigration consequences of criminal convictions. Make sure they review all your arrest information and criminal conviction documents. Do NOT consult “Notarios” if you have a criminal history.

For more information check out:


New Deferred Action Policy Q & A

Posted: June 21st, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments »

This Q&A Comes from the USCIS Website:

What documentation will be sufficient to demonstrate that an individual came to the United States before the age of 16?

Documentation sufficient for an individual to demonstrate that he or she came to the United States before the age of 16 includes, but is not limited to: financial records, medical records, school records, employment records, and military records.

What documentation will be sufficient to demonstrate that an individual has resided in the United States for a least five years preceding June 15, 2012?

Documentation sufficient for an individual to demonstrate that he or she has resided in the United States for at five years immediately preceding June 15, 2012 includes, but is not limited to: financial records, medical records, school records, employment records, and military records.

What documentation will be sufficient to demonstrate that an individual was physically present in the United States as of June 15, 2012?

Documentation sufficient for an individual to demonstrate that he or she was physically present on June 15, 2012, the date the memorandum was issued, includes, but is not limited to: financial records, medical records, school records, employment records, and military records.

What documentation will be sufficient to demonstrate that an individual is currently in school, has graduated from high school, or has obtained a general education development certificate (GED)?

Documentation sufficient for an individual to demonstrate that he or she is currently in school, has graduated from high school, or has obtained a GED certificate includes, but is not limited to: diplomas, GED certificates, report cards, and school transcripts.

What documentation will be sufficient to demonstrate that an individual is an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States?

Documentation sufficient for an individual to demonstrate that he or she is an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States includes, but is not limited to: report of separation forms, military personnel records, and military health records.

Are individuals with a conviction for a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, or multiple misdemeanors eligible for an exercise of prosecutorial discretion under this new process?

No. Individuals who have been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, or three or more other misdemeanor offenses not occurring on the same date and not arising out of the same act, omission, or scheme of misconduct are not eligible to be considered for deferred action under the new process.

What offenses qualify as a felony?

A felony is a federal, state, or local criminal offense punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year.

What offenses qualify as a “significant misdemeanor”?

A significant misdemeanor is a federal, state, or local criminal offense punishable by no more than one year of imprisonment or even no imprisonment that involves: violence, threats, or assault, including domestic violence; sexual abuse or exploitation; burglary, larceny, or fraud; driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs; obstruction of justice or bribery; unlawful flight from arrest, prosecution, or the scene of an accident; unlawful possession or use of a firearm; drug distribution or trafficking; or unlawful possession of drugs.

How many non-significant misdemeanors constitute “multiple misdemeanors” making an individual ineligible for an exercise of prosecutorial discretion under this new process?

An individual who is not convicted of a significant misdemeanor but is convicted of three or more other misdemeanors not occurring on the same day and not arising out of the same act, omission, or scheme of misconduct is not eligible to be considered for deferred action under this new process.

What qualifies as a national security or public safety threat?

If the background check or other information uncovered during the review of an individual’s request for deferred action indicates that the individual’s presence in the United States threatens public safety or national security, he or she will be ineligible for an exercise of prosecutorial discretion. Indicia that an individual poses such a threat include, but are not limited to, gang membership, participation in criminal activities, or participation in activities that threaten the United States.

Will dependents and other immediate relatives of individuals who receive deferred action pursuant to this process also be eligible to receive deferred action?

No. The new process is available only to those who satisfy the eligibility criteria. As a result, the immediate relatives, including dependents, of individuals who receive deferred action pursuant to this process are not eligible to apply for deferred action as part of this process unless they independently satisfy the eligibility criteria.

If I receive deferred action through this process, will I be able to travel outside the United States?

USCIS is exploring this issue and will resolve it in the coming weeks as part of its implementation plan.

Will there be any exceptions to the requirement that an individual must have resided in the United States for a least five years preceding June 15, 2012?

An individual must demonstrate that he or she has resided in the United States for a least five years preceding June 15, 2012. Brief and innocent absences undertaken for humanitarian purposes will not violate this requirement.

For more information check out:


Sarasota Immigration Attorneys Welcome Deferred Action Announcement

Posted: June 19th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , | 5 Comments »

JAENSCH IMMIGRATION LAW FIRM IS READY TO HELP THOSE WHO WANT TO KNOW MORE 

Sarasota, FL – On June 15, 2012, the Obama Administration announced that younger immigrants may be eligible for “Deferred Action” and work authorization.  The policy will grant qualified immigrants the opportunity to live free from fear of deportation and allow them to work legally. This exciting new development brings hope to immigrants and their families.

Not long after the announcement the attorneys at Jaensch Immigration Law Firm started getting calls from individuals interested in knowing their options. Attorney Victoria Jaensch Karins responded quickly. Together with the other attorneys she developed an intake sheet which interested persons can fill out to see if the new policy applies to their case.

“We are ready to offer qualified legal advice to any who seek it in the wake of the new policy,” says Ms. Karins.  “Unfortunately there are some people who pose as legal advisers but who are not qualified and who deliberately misinform people.” Ms. Karins wants to make sure that interested persons are aware first and foremost that the Administration is not yet accepting applications for deferred action unless the applicant is in deportation proceedings at this time.  There should be further instructions and an opening for applications after 60 days.

In regards to those who may intentionally misinform potential applicants, they are called “Notarios.” In theUnited States, notarios have no legal background and cannot act as a qualified attorney. For example, as mentioned above, individuals thinking of applying for deferred action should not do so unless they are in deportation proceedings. However, some notarios will claim that they can submit an application, for a fee. An immigrant’s case can be delayed by notarios acting in bad faith, resulting in penalties and even deportation.

“Be careful! Do not endanger your chance to qualify for this action,” said Ms. Karins. “Make sure to contact a genuine immigration lawyer who can help ensure your application has the best chance of being filed properly,” she continued.

For more information, contact Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, (941) 366-9841, or visit their blog, ImmigrationSarasota.com.


Deferred Action for Student Immigrants (DREAMers)

Posted: June 15th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | Tags: , , , , | 5 Comments »

DHS to Offer Deferred Action to Eligible DREAMers

Cite as “AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 12061560 (posted Jun. 15, 2012)”

DHS will formally announce this morning that it will offer deferred action to DREAMers. Preliminary information indicates that eligible applicants must:

  • Be 15-30 years old, and have entered before age 16
  • Have been present in the U.S. for 5 years as of June 15, 2012
  • Have maintained continuous residence
  • Have not been convicted of one serious crime or multiple minor crimes
  • Be currently enrolled in high school, graduated or have a GED, or have enlisted in the military.

The deferred action offer will be available to those in proceedings, as well as to those who apply affirmatively.

The White House is expected to make a formal announcement this afternoon at 1:15pm ET. AILA will provide further details today.

For more information check out:


From USCIS: Informational Poster About the Deferred Action Process

Posted: June 6th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action | No Comments »

We would like to remind people who are interested in the new deferred action policy that the government is not accepting applications yet.  There are those, such as notarios, who would harm potential applicants’ cases and ensure that they would never achieve their dream of citizenship.

For a visual that will help you understand, check out this USCIS Deferred Action Info Poster.

Other Articles on Deferred Action:

  1. More Deferred Action Announcement Q&A
  2. New Deferred Action Announcement Q&A
  3. Deferred Action Announcement (June 15, 2012)

Senators Reintroduce the DREAM Act

Posted: May 11th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action, National News | No Comments »

Washington, D.C. – Today, Senators Richard Durbin, Harry Reid, and Robert Menendez re-introduced the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act. Last fall, the DREAM Act passed the House of Representatives, and garnered the support of a majority in the Senate, but was ultimately defeated when the Senate failed to invoke cloture and proceed to debate. The sponsors of the DREAM Act hope to build on last year’s momentum and continue to highlight the importance of fully utilizing the talent and potential of thousands of young people who are Americans in every way but their birth certificates.

First introduced in 2001, the DREAM Act would address the plight of young immigrants who have been raised in the U.S. and managed to succeed despite the challenges of being brought here without proper documentation. The proposal would offer a path to legal status to those who have graduated from high school, stayed out of trouble, and plan to attend college or serve in the U.S. military for at least two years.

Each year, approximately 65,000 undocumented students graduate from high school, many at the top of their classes, but cannot go on to college, join the military, work, or otherwise pursue their dreams. They belong to the 1.5 generation: immigrants brought to the United States at a young age who were largely raised in this country and therefore share much in common with second-generation Americans. These students are culturally American and fluent in English, growing up here and often having little attachment to their country of birth.

The moral, intellectual and practical rationale for the DREAM Act is overwhelming. The White House supports it. The Departments of Homeland Security (DHS) and Justice, entrusted with enforcing and implementing our immigration laws, support it. The Department of Education and America’s academic and faith community support it, as well as state legislators, community groups, and the American public. The DREAM Act is even part of the Department of Defense’s 2010-2012 Strategic Plan to assist the military in its recruiting efforts.

Despite broad support for the legislative proposal, the divisive political environment around immigration poses an enormous challenge for the DREAM Act. If Congress fails to act, the Administration can and should take more decisive steps to ensure that the values driving their legislative agenda are reflected in their implementation and interpretation of current law.  DHS should ensure that its officers use their prosecutorial discretion to defer the removal of any eligible student caught up in the broken immigration system.

For research and resources on the DREAM Act visit IPC’s resource page:


Final DREAM Vote Set for Saturday – Urgent Senate Action Needed!

Posted: December 17th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action, National News | No Comments »

This is our best and last shot for the DREAM Act this Congress – Keep calling Senate offices!

On Thursday night Dec. 16, Senate Majority Leader Reid filed cloture on the Dream Act (H.R. 5281) setting the bill up for the critical “cloture” vote in the Senate expected on Saturday.  The Senate will need 60 votes for Dream to move forward.  With the House’s passage of Dream last week, we are closer than ever to victory!

This is the vote we’ve all been waiting for.  With only days left in the Lame-Duck, there won’t be another chance.  You must continue making calls and sending emails to all Senators to urge them to vote “yes” on DREAM when the Senate brings it up for a vote. A list of key swing Senate targets is included.

Click on the Take Action link to enter your zip code, get the contact information for your Senators, and find useful talking points for your call.

All Offices Should be contacted, but if you live in these states, we REALLY need your support because one of your Senators is a SWING VOTE on DREAM!