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E-2 Treaty Investor non-immigrant visa holders could get Green Card after 10 years and their children can legally work from age 18

Posted: May 5th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, National News, Sarasota Immigrants | No Comments »

P Christopher Jaensch

P Christopher Jaensch, Lawyer and Owner Jaensch Immigration Law Firm Sarasota

Sarasota Immigration Law Firm, Jaensch Immigration, are behind a new Bill being proposed by local Congressman David Jolly that would give E-2 Treaty Investor non-immigrant visas holders the right to apply for a Green Card after 10 years. It would also allow their children to stay in the country between the ages of 18 and 26 and be able to work without applying for their own visa.

Sarasota business immigration attorney, P. Christopher Jaensch, thinks that the new bill, if passed, could significantly improve the Florida economy.  He says,

“We already use the E-2 Treaty Investor visa as one of the main strategies for Canadians and Europeans who want to spend more time in the U.S.  The visa requires them to invest a substantial amount of money—usually more than $100,000—in an active business that will create jobs for U.S. workers.  They can start a new business or purchase an existing business, but must own a controlling interest and must come from a country with an investment treaty with the U.S.  However, many of our clients express dismay that they are making a major investment in the U.S. without having a way to get permission to stay permanently.  For clients with children, they are very concerned about how the children will be able to stay in the U.S. once they are 21.  This proposed law would help address these concerns and, I think, would increase the number of investors interested in the E-2 program.”

Karen Galkoff moved to Sarasota from the UK in 2013 with her husband and 3 children to open Fringe Spa Salon on an E-2 visa. Karen explains, “We’ve opened a business and we’re not only creating employment but also putting money back into the local economy by using local suppliers. Fringe has expanded and is growing nearly 100% year on year. Whilst we have a 5 year visa we always have “what if it’s not renewed” and “what happens when the kids want to get jobs” in the back of our minds. The proposed changes would give us the confidence to drive forward with our growth plans in Sarasota.”

Florida congressman, David Jolly, has announced that he will be filing a bill that would allow those on E-2 Treaty Investor non-immigrant visas to gain lawful permanent residence after ten years. The Bill would also remove a huge headache that most investors face and that’s their children being able to stay and work in the USA once they turn 18. Jolly’s proposed Bill “E-2 Visa Improvement Act of 2015” is at the very early stages. The key facts are as follows:

  • The E-2 visa holder needs to have lived and successfully worked in the USA for at least 10 years
  • They must have created full time employment for no fewer than two individuals
  • There will be a limitation of 10,000 visas in any fiscal year
  • At 18 Children can work and then remain in the US until they are 26 (regardless of length of time their parents have held an E-2)
  • Children 26 years of age or younger would automatically be covered

Speaking to an audience in Pinellas Park, Congressman Jolly said: “Every day the immigration reform debate hits the headlines, but only focuses on those here in the US illegally, what about those who are legally obliged to be here?”

A key driver for Congressman Jolly is to help encourage international entrepreneurs to come to the USA and share their talents and expertise. Speaking to an audience in Pinellas Park, Congressman Jolly said: “Every day the immigration reform debate hits the headlines, but only focuses on those here in the US illegally, what about those who are legally obliged to be here? Those who enter our country legally on nonimmigrant E-2 Treaty Investor Visas come from all over the world to start a business in our country, bringing with them the entrepreneurial spirit to start businesses and fully integrate into our communities. Without an opportunity for permanent residency these visa holders cannot take the next step in carrying out the American dream that initially brought them to the United States. So this week introduced H.R. 1834, a bill that allows business owners in the United States on E-2 visas the opportunity for permanent residency after 10 years. Currently, all E-2 nonimmigrants must maintain an intention to depart the U.S. when their status expires or is terminated. Further, their children must leave the United States or apply for another visa when they turn 21 years old. Under my bill, children of E-2 Treaty Investor Visa holders can stay in the U.S. until they are 26 years old and can apply for work at 18 years of age.”

The Bill does not propose changing the need to re-apply for an E-2 visa until the minimum time of 10 years in the USA has been achieved meaning that those on a 5 year visa will still need to renew at the 5th and 10th year. According to the US Department of State, there were over 35,000 E-2 Visa’s approved in 2013.

Congressman Jolly went on to say: “I think people in Congress will recognize the importance of addressing legal immigration at the same time we’re having a national debate about illegal immigration. It’s only fair that we do so and it’s right that we do so. Whenever you have comprehensive immigration reform, it is hard to pass small provisions. This one, I hope, is a very simple one that we could move outside of the comprehensive immigration reform. Let’s recognize the contribution of legal immigrants now, but it may be that this gets wrapped into comprehensive immigration reform, and I’m okay with that. We’re prepared to have that conversation.”

Update from AILA CFC: Immigration Lawyers Advocate for Unaccompanied Children, End Unlawful “Detainers”

Posted: August 6th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , , , , , , | No Comments »

AILA CFC Advocates for Unaccompanied Children at Border

Country conditions in Central American countries such as El Salvador and Honduras have resulted in over 50,000 unaccompanied minor children making treacherous journeys to seek safety in the U.S. since October 2013. Some may be able to stay in the U.S. if they can demonstrate that their lives will be jeopardized if they returned to their country of origin. The Obama administration has started to speed up the process of scheduling immigration hearings on these children. AILA National, AILA Central Florida and legal aid organizations in Central Florida are working together to ensure that children in this region at least have basic legal representation.

The Obama Administration is considering administrative fixes due to Congressional inaction on immigration reform. These include potential remedies for undocumented parents of U.S. citizens here, and revising the way available green card numbers are counted so as to reduce waiting times in employment and family-based categories. An announcement could come as early as this month. AILA has been on the front line of presenting potential administrative fixes to the administration.

 AILA CFC Works to End Unlawful “Detainers”

Detainers are the so-called “immigration holds” that local police engage in on behalf of ICE. When someone suspected by law enforcement to be undocumented is detained by local police such as for a traffic stop, Sheriff’s offices are permitted to hold that individual for 48 hours while ICE determined their immigration status or whether to pursue removal proceedings against them.

Often Sheriff’s offices hold people for much longer than 48 hours. Some of these individuals are U.S. citizens or green card holders.  Immigration violations are a civil matter, not a criminal matter, and these individuals should not be held indefinitely without probable cause that they have committed a crime. Counties incur substantial costs and liability in breaking the law on behalf of ICE.  

Due to efforts by the ACLU, The Miami Law School Immigration Law Clinic, AILA Central Florida, and AILA South Florida, and other organizations, Sheriff’s offices throughout the state are ceasing these detainers unless there is probable cause to detain.

NEW Florida Business Opportunity on Anna Maria Island

Posted: June 24th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Investor Visas, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , , , , , | No Comments »

Today we learned about a new business opportunity for Florida immigrants who are searching for good investments that can help them qualify for an E-2 or EB-5 visa.  It comes in the form of a 3,088 sq-ft restaurant on a barrier island near Sarasota with a cozy 3-bedroom apartment above – makes for an easy commute.


STOCK image of restaurant interior. Contact the broker for real photos.

The details:

  • 3,088 SF restaurant with full bar (4-COP) located in Holmes beach, with gulf views.
  • Additional 1,400 SF 3BD apartment above.
  • Sale price: $475,000.
  • Rent would be $5,000 per mo. (including the apt. above) plus Tenant pays
  • Property taxes, insurance & Maint. (about $13,000 yr)
  • The restaurant did about $500k for 2013 (open only for dinner 7 nights)
  • Cash flow: $183,000.
  • If you deduct the expense of rent and NNN charges ($73,000) the net to a new operator would be about $110k.
  • Real estate is also for sale for $1.3M

Interested parties should contact Mr. John Caragiulo, an experienced business broker, at

As always, the attorneys at Jaensch Immigration Law Firm stand ready to advise you on making any investment with the goal of securing a temporary E-2 or immigrant EB-5 visa.

Sarasota Attorney Victoria Karins Elected Chair of AILA

Posted: June 18th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment »

Victoria Karins Re-Assumes Role as Leader of Central Florida Immigration Attorneys

Sarasota Immigration Attorney Victoria Jaensch Karins

Sarasota Immigration Attorney Victoria Jaensch Karins

Sarasota, FL 6/16/2014: Sarasota attorney Victoria Jaensch Karins was re-elected Chair of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association in June.  She assumes this leadership role amid an era of change in immigration law.

The announcement of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals has been followed by the stall of immigration reform in the House.  During this time, the Obama Administration has made additional changes at the Federal level to immigration procedure that build on Deferred Action.

Changes have also occurred at the state level.  Bills that allow undocumented childhood arrivals to qualify for in-state tuition and to practice law in Florida are among a few of the latest developments.

Ms. Karins brings continuity and experience to her role as Chair.  This is the second year in a row she’s been elected to the leadership and she has practiced immigration law for almost 20 years.

She has been taking an active part in her role; traveling to DC twice to speak before lawmakers and blogging for the AILA website.

“I’m honored to have been elected to the leadership by such dedicated and hard-working peers,” Ms. Karins said.  “It’s very interesting to be so involved at this time of transformation,” she continued.

90-year-old Sarasota Immigrant Becomes Citizen

Posted: May 21st, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Congratulations to Don Fisher for recently completing the naturalization process and becoming a U.S. citizen at the age of 90.  Don first moved to the U.S. in 1984 and had E-2 Treaty Investor visa status from 1987 to 2010.  After six consecutive E-2 visas Don married a U.S. citizen and became a permanent resident in 2010.  

At age 90, Don is believed to be the oldest client in the 30 year history of Jaensch Immigration Law Firm to become a U.S. citizen.  We took a picture of Don in the office with his Naturalization Certificate.

Don says the following about the process, “it was a challenge, but we did enjoy the chase.” 

Congratulations again to Don Fisher!

-P. Christopher Jaensch

Talented German Artist Shares Her Work With Jaensch Immigration Law Firm

Posted: May 8th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Athlete & Artist Visas, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , | No Comments »

EBBA Kaynak, accomplished German sculpture artist, has been creating art based on the theme of “in-between” for years.  When our firm helped one of her friends she heard about us and decided to get in touch.

Here below is a short description of her story with images of her work interspersed.  Anyone interested can visit her website to learn more.

My life surely has quite a lot do do with the big question, where do I belong to… where is my “Heimat”?

My grandfather was a Sudet German lawyer in Reichenberg, the German part of former Chechoslovakia. After World War II all Germans were thrown out of that country, and my family moved to the soft hilly southwest of Germany. Although the landsape was similar to their beloved former home, the mentality of the Svabians was strange for them. My father, coming from Alsace, the German region of France met my mother in the Black Forest. Their love didn’t last long, so I grew up with my “Sudet German” family.

Cheurbin Chrysolith

Growing up I always felt different from the others. In school I studied languages and mastered English, French and Latin. I went on to study Art in the Academy in Stuttgart, and learned Greek as well.  During my summers at the academy I would go to Greece. That’s where I came to feel most “at home.”

At the end of my studies I met a Turkish man in Istanbul.  We married, I learned the Turkish language, and we built a house in western Turkey. Changing my culture was not complicated for me, even though I was completely veiled. I loved my big Turkish family and raised my children there. Unfortunately, it all came to a bitter end.

Coming back to Germany was the beginning of feeling home there for the first time of my life. I bought a house, took care of my mother and children, rented a room in an old factory for atelier and began to work as an artist.

My connection to dance is very important to me. I discovered Salsa when I was 26 on a trip in South America. I got connected with the Salsa movement in Germany and I am still practicing. Most of the movement in my sculptures gets its origin in that rythm and motion.


I started my career as a sculpturor with a chainsaw and natural wood. My firth themes were either spirals or archaic round erotic female objects: Venus and AN-NA.


Later on I began to pose my AN-NAs between two shelves, creating the effect out of a single piece of wood.  It was an expression of my situation of being “in between.” Soon I understood this new form as being the synonym for my own life in between all places and cultures. The situation of being “in between” became itself a sculptural body. The fictional walls at the left and at the right became arms and legs of a new art creature. This form changed over time from very abstract to more realistic.

In Between

In my hometown I’m now one of the best known artists.  I make a living from selling my sculptures and pictures. The last four years I created a new form: the Cherubins on wheels, so described by Ezechiel in the old testament of the Bible. As he describes these angels as having wheels like “chrysolith,” I started making very small silver figures with wheels of chrysolith.

Ebba Kaynak

EBBA Kaynak, Schorndorf / Germany 2014

What’s Happening to Florida?

Posted: May 8th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Attorney Victoria Karins was asked to write a guest blog post on the AILA Blog.  We reposted the article below.

Author:  on 05/08/2014

shutterstock_33919990Last week, the Florida legislature passed two bills that are heading to Governor Rick Scott, who has stated that he will sign them. One grants in-state tuition to undocumented “Dreamers.” Another will allow Jose Godinez-Samperio, a DACA recipient and law school graduate, the ability to be a licensed attorney in the State. Jose was in Tallahassee in the gallery on the day the Florida House passed the bill. He was given a standing ovation.

I am still shaking my head. What happened to Florida? Gov. Scott ran on a platform in 2010 that called for Arizona-type laws to be enacted. Four years later, he is supporting significant pro-immigration legislation. I thought we could easily count on current Florida leadership to remain oppositional to any pro-immigration issue that was not forced upon them.

It would be easy to be cynical and chalk it up to politics. It is an election year, after all, and perhaps some politicians are finally realizing it is not a bad idea to try to garner favor in the immigrant community.

Certainly I believe that is a big part of it. But, I also think that we may be witnessing a change in attitude across the board.

After the vote last Friday, I was contacted by a local newspaper columnist who had written earlier in the week in support of the Jose Godinez-Samperio bill. He had received responses from readers asking questions such as “Why didn’t he apply for citizenship?” “Why does he need a special law, couldn’t he have started the citizenship process during law school?” “Didn’t he want to become a citizen?”

He contacted me to make sure he was not missing anything – that there had been no change to federal immigration law recently of which he was not aware. I assured him that no, there had been no recent change.

The columnist, Tom Lyons, from the Sarasota Herald Tribune, then wrote a follow-up column clarifying that Jose did not have the option of obtaining citizenship and said of the questioners:

the more I thought about those people who wanted to know why that would-be lawyer hadn’t applied for citizenship, the more I thought kindly of them. Though they apparently missed a key point in the nation’s immigration debate, I think their question was based on a nice assumption. They assumed that U.S. law couldn’t be as rigid and mean as it actually is.

This illustrates what I believe is also happening in Florida; people are becoming more educated about the issues. And as they get more educated, they may be becoming more compassionate…and passionate to do the right thing.

I only hope that the individuals in office at the national level take a look at what is happening in Florida since I hear Florida might just be a tad bit important when it comes to presidential elections.  I hope they realize that the House really needs to follow Florida’s lead and move forward on immigration reform.

By Victoria Jaensch Karins, Chair, AILA Central Florida Chapter

Victoria Jaensch Karins Quoted in SRQ Herald Tribune

Posted: April 4th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Scroll to bottom to see her quote. Reposted from Herald Tribune Website:

Making a case for in-state tuition

By Zac Anderson , Herald-Tribune
/ Thursday, April 3, 2014

Mylena DeMaman has been working and saving for college since graduating from Sarasota High School in 2012, but the high cost of continuing her education can be disheartening.

The 19-year-old recently filled out an application to attend State College of Florida and was dismayed to learn she may have to pay much more than most students — $11,595 annually to attend full-time versus $3,074 for the typical Florida resident.

Mylena DeMaman has lived in Sarasota for a decade, plenty of time to qualify for cheaper in-state tuition at a Florida university. DeMaman is applying to State College of Florida and hopes to get an associate's degree before moving on to a Florida university.  But because DeMaman's parents brought her to the country illegally as a young girl, the bright 19-year-old with ambitions of becoming a doctor will have to pay triple what other Florida residents do for college. DeMaman believes that is unfair. Surprisingly, many state lawmakers agree. Legislation has already cleared the House and is advancing in the Senate that would give undocumented college students such as DeMaman in-state tuition.    (Apr. 2, 2014; Herald-Tribune staff photo by Mike Lang)

Mylena DeMaman is applying to State College of Florida and hopes to get an associate’s degree before moving on to a Florida university. But because DeMaman’s parents brought her to the country illegally as a young girl, the bright 19-year-old with ambitions of becoming a doctor will have to pay triple what other Florida residents do for college.  (Staff photo by Mike Lang)

The extra cost stems from the fact that DeMaman’s family came to the United States from Brazil illegally a decade ago.

Undocumented immigrants pay the higher “out of state” tuition rate at most Florida colleges and universities, but that could soon change. In a surprising move that has divided Republicans and contradicts previous efforts by state leaders such as Gov. Rick Scott to crack down on immigrants who came to the country illegally, momentum is building to grant in-state tuition to undocumented students who have attended Florida high schools.

Political observers say the legislation — which has cleared the House and passed a second Senate committee this week — is a concession to the demographic changes shaping Florida.

Hispanics are an increasingly influential voting bloc. They made up 17 percent of the Florida electorate in the 2012 presidential election, up from 14 percent in 2008, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. These voters lean heavily Democratic: President Barack Obama won 60 percent of Florida Hispanics in 2012. Republicans would like to change that equation going forward.

“2012 was a demographic reality check for Republican strategists,” said New College of Florida political science professor Frank Alcock.

The in-state tuition bill is a significant step by Florida GOP leaders toward Hispanic outreach. It has been championed by House Speaker Will Weatherford, a Wesley Chapel Republican seen as a potential candidate for statewide office. But the legislation is not without political risks, especially for Scott.

The governor won office in 2010 touting a tough Arizona immigration law that critics said amounted to racial profiling. He also supported forcing Florida businesses to electronically verify that their workers are in the country legally.

Scott’s hard-line immigration views endeared him to the Tea Party and likely contributed to his closely contested primary victory. Many conservatives strongly oppose the in-state tuition bill and say Scott’s signature on the legislation would be a betrayal.

“He’d be making a mistake to support this bill,” said Beth Colvin with the Sarasota Patriots, a local Tea Party group. “I just feel the majority of the conservatives have faith in him because he does have his values and his heart in the right place and I just don’t feel like there’s any need for us to reach out to illegals.”

Yet Scott long ago stopped talking about the Arizona immigration law or E-verify, and appears to be moving toward the center on immigration issues. He expressed support for the Senate tuition bill this week, but avoided talking specifically about illegal immigrants.

Lawmakers have sweetened the legislation by including one of Scott’s top priorities in the bill, a provision that limits universities from hiking tuition without legislative approval.

That allows Scott to sell the legislation as a financial boon for all students, not just undocumented immigrants.

“On behalf of all of Florida’s families who dream of a brighter future for their kids, and all of our students who aspire to achieve success in the classroom and in the workforce, we will keep fighting to help every student in Florida afford a college education,” Scott said in a statement after the bill passed the Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday by a 7-2 vote, with four Republicans in support and two in opposition.

Alcock said Scott is walking a fine line with the tuition measure, trying to “have his cake and eat it” by quietly backing a priority of the Hispanic community while working to minimize Tea Party anger. Ultimately, the rewards are probably worth the risk.

“Tea Party people are going to show up no matter what and they’re not going to vote for” Scott’s Democratic opponent, expected to be Charlie Crist, Alcock said.

The legislation still has two more committee stops in the Senate. The fact that top Republicans on the Judiciary Committee voted for the bill is a favorable sign for the measure. Supporters included Sen. John Thrasher, the former Republican Party of Florida chairman, and Sen. Andy Gardiner, the next Senate president.

Sen. Bill Galvano, R-Bradenton, voted against the bill at an earlier committee stop but has agreed to let it be heard next by the Appropriations Subcommittee on Education, which Galvano chairs. Sen. Nancy Detert, R-Venice, also is on the committee.

There is strong interest in the issue among the Hispanic population in Sarasota and Manatee counties, said Victoria Karins, a Sarasota immigration attorney who has helped DeMaman and roughly 150 other young people in the region gain a measure of legal status through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program announced by President Barack Obama in 2012.

Deferred action allows younger immigrants who have been in the country for years to obtain a driver’s license, Social Security number and limited protection against deportation.

The in-state tuition bill is another step toward “being able to really fully integrate them into society,” Karins said.

DeMaman’s father works as a mechanic. Her mother cleans houses. They emphasize the importance of education.

“They always tell us, ‘The reason why we brought you to this country was to do good in school,’ and fortunately I really like school,” said DeMaman, who has lived in Sarasota since the fourth grade and speaks without an accent.

Bright and highly motivated, DeMaman has long been focused on a medical career. She took medical billing classes at the Sarasota County Technical Institute while in high school and served as president of SCTI’s Future Business Leaders of America club.

Working at a medical practice over the last year has sparked an interest in becoming a doctor. But the costs can seem daunting.

“It is discouraging,” she said. “And why would you want to discourage somebody from getting an education?”

Legislature Debates In-State Tuition Rates for Undocumented Students

Posted: March 20th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Reposted from ABC7’s
Posted: Wednesday, March 19, 2014 4:56 pm

SARASOTA, Fla. — The Florida House of Representatives is taking up a bill that would offer in-state tuition rates to children of undocumented immigrants living in Florida, with hundreds of affected students in Tallahassee today urging more lawmakers to support the cause.

In-state tuition for children of undocumented immigrants has been a controversial topic, though the move has gotten bipartisan support in recent months.

“I just started this semester and for two classes I paid almost $3,000,” says Thania Erresuris, a student at State College of Florida. While $3,000 for one semester may not sound all that alarming, that amount is 380 percent higher than the in-state rate. Erresuris is forced to pay the higher rate despite the fact that she’s lived in Florida for most of her life.

“I had to do the Dream Act, so I’m basically not a resident in the eyes of the school, so I have to do out-of-state tuition,” she says. “I don’t like it because I’ve been here since I was 3 and this is my home, and I feel like it’s unfair because I’ve never been over to Mexico or anything.”

Erresuris is one of the many undocumented students facing what she calls unjust tuition rates.

“If it was regular tuition I would be able to take more classes, but because of [the higher cost] I can only take two,” she says.

The issue has caught the attention of lawmakers, with the Senate Education Committee passing a measure to that would allow undocumented immigrants to pay in-state college tuition. With the bill coming before the entire House Wednesday, immigration attorney Victoria Karins says passage would have a major impact

“This bill will largely benefit the Hispanic community, as that population is trying its hardest to advance in our society by attempting to get a better education [and] better jobs,” Karins says.

For dreamers like Erresuris, who is also a single mother on a fixed income, yes votes for HB 851 and SB 1400 would allow her to take more than two classes a semester, in turn helping her reach her ultimate goal much quicker.

“For me, education is important because I want to prove to my daughter that they need education. … I want to study nursing. I want to be a nurse. I want to actually further it to be a doctor, and I need this education to be able to further my self in life.” Erresuris says.
The House was still debating the measure as we published this story. We will update this page as more information about the vote becomes available.

Announcing German Film Festival, April 1-9

Posted: March 7th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Screenshot (6)

Roman Jasek: How to be a Successful Immigrant-Entrepreneur

Posted: February 24th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Sarasota Immigrant from Czech Republic offers home theater installation and explains why more and more Czech immigrants are calling Sarasota-Bradenton home.

Roman Jasek is one of 1.5 million people who immigrate to the United States every year.  What’s more, he is an immigrant who came to America to work and build a business.  Recently, we sat down with Roman to talk about his story.  Please enjoy. Tell us about your background.

Roman Jasek:  I come from the Czech Republic.  In university in Brno I studied electrical engineering.  But even before college I had started a clothing wholesale company and after college I began modeling and doing catwalk shows. That’s a departure.

RJ: Yes, but I was good at it.  I even won the Mr. Czech Republic in 1995.  Unfortunately, in 1997 I got into a car accident and wasn’t able to do any modeling after that. What did you decide to do then?

RJ: I decided to follow up on my childhood dream to come to the United States. Why that dream?

RJ: I had always wanted more than what the Czech Republic could provide me.  I remember as a teenager telling my parents that I wanted to leave the Czech Republic, that was before the fall of the Communist regime.  With the interruption of my modeling career I decided it was time to realize my goal.  I sold or gave everything away.  When I arrived in the US I had $800.  I didn’t speak any English. What do you do now?

RJ: I run a company called Audio and Communications Experts.  We install home theaters, home automation systems, lighting control, central vacuum systems and more.  I estimate we’ve worked on over 250 houses since we started.  Our website is

Home theaters are one of the many things that Roman Janesk can do.

Home theaters are one of the many things that Roman Janesk can do. Tell us more about your services.

RJ: Our two most popular services are home theater design and home automation.

The first step to home theater design is determining if you want a traditional home theater or a dedicated home theater.  A traditional home theater is set up in an area such as a family room or living room, so there’s already an existing space along with furniture.  Clients choose from plasma or LED screens, projectors and speaker set-ups, and we discuss what audio/video selection will provide the best viewing & listening enjoyment.

A dedicated home theater features custom designed seating, lighting, sound and picture. We understand this is a big investment in time and money, so we work with you to create a movie theater feel right in your own home.

We start with a few basic questions about the design:

  • How big is the room you want to transform? This will determine the overall layout and sound design.
  • How many people do you want the room to hold? We work with contractors who create a custom designed seating configuration. You can choose from anything from stadium seating to all-leather couches.
  • Lastly, we need to determine how large a screen will fit in the room.  Using a basic formula of the screen being one half the size of the distance from where you sit, we’ll help you pick the right monitor, projector screen etc.

Ambient lighting is important because it not only sets the tone of your home theater room, it also determines what kind of projector or television you purchase.  Lighting can be as simple as using dimmers.  We also install lighting to our clients’ specifications.

An example of a custom-built in-home theater

An example of a custom-built in-home theater Tell us more about home automation.

RJ: Imagine an iPad or touch panel that takes care of lights, drapes, HVAC, and A/V with one touch.  A door that can tell you when your teenager gets home.  A sprinkler system that knows the weather forecast and a garage door that remembers to close itself if left open.  That’s what we call Home Automation.

There is no better or more economical time to design and install a home wiring system than while your home is being constructed.  Don’t limit the dream home you are building today to technologies that will be obsolete tomorrow.  With the proper design and materials, your new home will be ready for the future of digital technology.

Your home’s wiring is the skeleton upon which your future electronic lifestyle is built. Audio/video structured wiring solutions start with a centralized wiring panel that is organized, easy to service and able to be modified to cater to your needs and the design of your home.

Because future technologies are uncertain, the best way to ensure that your home wiring will be compatible is to design in a level of expandability from the beginning. With the right combination of Category 5 telephone wire, RG-6 coaxial cable and speaker wire you can be sure that you will have the right cable and available bandwidth throughout your home.

The most versatile wire you will install in your home is known in the industry as “Category 5″ cable. It is ideal for phones, fax machines, computer modems, computer networks, and as control wire for today and tomorrow’s sophisticated home automation and distributed audio/video systems.  We only use the highest quality Category 5 cable in designs that consider present needs and future possibilities.

Because you live with your home’s wiring system for a very long time, selecting the right company for its design and installation is critical.  Our highly trained and experienced staff of installation technicians will ensure that your home wiring is done properly the first time – on time and on budget.

We have the expertise not only in the wiring of your home, but also in the audio/video and home automation systems that must be made to work with that wiring.  We can plan the system, pre-wire your new home, then do the final installation of your home theater, multi-room audio/video system, or even your sophisticated home automation system.

Home Automation is the wave of the future.

Home Automation is the wave of the future. We hear you have been very busy lately.

RJ: I am one of the few contractors who does what I do with an Electric Specialty License.  This has really helped me get more work from builders.  I’ve also noticed that the number of Czech immigrants to the Sarasota-Bradenton area has increased in recent years.  When we first started I had close to 0 Czech clients, now Czechs make up about 20% of my clients.  Of course, since I am Czech, this is a nice niche to be able to service. What do you think is bringing the Czechs to Sarasota?

RJ: Many Czechs are coming, buying houses, starting companies and patronizing local businesses.  They are attracted by the affordable housing prices and the beautiful weather.  As the Czech community grows and word of mouth gets back to the Czech Republic, more and more people decide to come. It’s a good self-reinforcing cycle.  Roman, what would you say separates you from your competition?

RJ: We keep things simple and personal.  I have two guys who work with me, no more.  I stay on top of every project and give it my own undivided attention.  I really think it’s that belief in customer service and the fact that I treat every house I work on as if it were my own that sets us apart. What are your plans for the future?

RJ: We plan on opening a showroom downtown.  We want a way for customers to see and touch the changes we can make in their homes.  We’re starting to put the numbers together now and we’re hoping to open this fall. We wish you the best of luck.  Thank you for your time.

RJ: Thank you.

Upcoming Events for Immigrants

Posted: February 4th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Investor Visas, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , , | No Comments »


Hillsborough Community College (HCC) has paired with Workforce Florida and Cross Border Partners using a Trade and Logistics Grant to provide you and/or your staff training on various trade topics. Grant funding is available to support training across a wide variety of topic areas from market selection, export documentation and compliance, tariff codes, legal aspects, etc. And, the programs can be tailored to individual company needs. These programs are available to all Florida for-profit companies that have been in business at least one year and are involved in any export-related activity. The grant generally covers 75% of training costs.

For more details, visit here or contact Brian Hollands, Hillsborough Community College at 813-253-7074 or; OR Gary Leskun, Cross Border Partners, at mobile: 813-731-0152 or



Organizer: Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at the University of South Florida
When: Thursdays, February 13, 20 and 27 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM (3 sessions)
Where: SBDC office at the Tampa Port Authority building, 1101 Channelside Drive, Tampa, FL 33602
Cost: $120. Includes 3 modules, 3 textbooks and valuable handouts.
Contact: SBDC at 813-905-5829
Description: Training modules run Feb. 13, 20 & 27. Includes: INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL TRADE – Feb. 13; DEALING WITH YOUR EXPORT MARKET – Feb. 20; EXPORT DOCUMENTATION AND COMPLIANCE – Feb. 27.


Organizer: U.S. Commercial Service, Alabama District Export Council, BIS
When: February 12 & February 13, 2014 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Where: Westin Hotel Huntsville- 6800 Governors West Rd NW, Huntsville, Alabama
Cost: $500 for two day seminar, $275 for one day, and includes materials, continental breakfast and lunch.
Registration Deadline: Friday, February 7
Contact: Robert Stackpole at 205-731-1331 or
Description: This seminar will provide an in-depth understanding of the transition of items and export transactions from the USML to the CCL. Topics will address: realignment of the control lists, Commerce Control List order of review, the new “600” series, definition of “specially designed,” and license exceptions. The Technology Controls seminar will focus on the regulatory requirements relating to technology and software, including what is considered an export or re-export of technology or software; what technology and software is subject to the EAR; how to determine the Export Control Classification Number (ECCN); what license exceptions are available; and the unique application requirements of technology and software. BIS technical and policy specialists will also discuss important export control issues that may arise in the employment of foreign nationals and for foreign items incorporating, or produced from, controlled U.S.-origin software and technology. Presenters will include senior policy, regulatory, and licensing specialists.


Organizer: U.S. Commercial Service
When: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. (eastern)
Where: your computer
Cost: $15
Contact: Rachel Kreissl at 727-464-4166 or
Description: Whether you are doing business or planning to with Russia or another Customs Union country, this webinar will brief you on the new customs union regulations and related technical standard changes.


Organizer: U.S. Commercial Service
When: March 5 (seminar) and March 6 (workshop)
Where: NOVA Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Cost: $225 (seminar) and $75 (workshop)
Contacts: Leandro Solórzano at 954-356-6647 or; Martina Echevarria at 305-526-7425 x26 or
Description: As of April 5, 2014, new export requirements will be implemented that amend the AES regulations published in 2008. This Export Compliance Seminar is an all-day program where officers from the Department of Commerce/Census will provide training on export filing requirements.


TRADE WINDS – THE AMERICAS 2014: Business Development Conference and Trade Mission
Organizer: U.S. Commercial Service
When: May 15-23, 2014
Where: Colombia (May 19-21), and optional stops to Panama or Ecuador (May 15-16) and Peru or Chile (May 22-23)
Contacts: Leslie Drake at 304.347.5123 or; Janice Barlow at 215.597.6126 or
Description: South American regional conference preceded and followed by one-on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, agents, distributors, joint-venture partners or other key contacts.


CARIBBEAN TRADE MISSION & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE: Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Bahamas, Barbados and Trinidad & Tobago
Organizer: U.S. Commercial Service
When: June 8-12, 2014
Where: Dominican Republic, with optional stops in Haiti, Jamaica, Bahamas, Barbados, or Trinidad & Tobago
Registration Deadline: April 4, 2014
Contact: David Royce at 817-999-9757 or
Description: Caribbean regional conference followed by one-on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, agents, distributors, joint-venture partners or other key contacts.

What Immigrants Need to Know About the Affordable Care Act

Posted: November 21st, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment »

Re-posted from

SARASOTA COUNTY, Fla.- The Affordable Care Act has had its problems the past few months, and adding to the confusion is the mandate that immigrants must have health insurance as well, or risk being penalized.

“The Affordable Care Act does apply to anyone who is legally present in the United States, so that includes obviously U.S. citizens, permanent residents, but also people here with temporary visas,” says Victoria Karins.

Victoria Karins is a well-known immigration attorney at Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, in Sarasota county. She tells us the mandate may affect the economy here on the Suncoast.

“This may be one more thing that could possibly lead our snowbirds and other tourists that we rely on to go somewhere else. If it’s something that’s going to increase expenses and not benefit them, I think it’s a factor that they’ll take into consideration when deciding where they want to spend their tourism dollars, “said Karins.

We asked a couple from Scotland, who visit the Suncoast a few times a year, if they would consider buying a second home here despite the new mandate.

“It would stop us from coming because we have free national health service. When we come here on vacation we have to pay, so if coming to stay longer, we’d be paying even more money,” said Marion Elder, a tourist from Scotland.

However, some say it would be a dream to live in the United States and would want the coverage.

“We are prepared to pay, but within limits. It depends on how much it would cost for the health insurance,” said Bill Wiggs, visiting from England.

According to the latest census data, immigrants made up 12.2% of Manatee County’s population and 11.5% in Sarasota County. That’s more than 88,000 immigrants on the Suncoast, most of whom are migrant agricultural workers or have a second home here and both groups help fuel our economy.

Immigration law firms and insurance groups like, Professional Benefits Inc. in Sarasota, are great resources here on the Suncoast to help guide immigrants that have further questions.

Pro-Immigration Video From Sarasota Immigrant

Posted: October 29th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

A friend of the attorneys at Jaensch Immigration Law Firm recently submitted a video he made about the life of undocumented immigrants in New York and the hope that immigration reform is giving them for achieving the American Dream.  

Partha first arrived from India to play tennis at IMG Academy.  He won a tennis scholarship to study at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania and obtained his degree.  He worked in investment banking for a while before deciding to follow his passion to become a filmmaker and moving to New York City.

Seeing the plight of undocumented immigrants in NYC and being an immigrant himself, Partha decided to add his voice to the call for reform through film.  As he put it, he wanted to differentiate himself from the many other films being done about this issue by making his a fiction piece, and incorporating more comedy.  By showing just how ridiculous the situation can be for some of the nation’s immigrants, he hopes to produce serious reflection on immigration law and its economic impact, healthcare and human trafficking.

Below you will find the first mini-promo Partha filmed.  He plans on filming two more.  He is using the promos to gather support for filming a full-length feature.  His goal is to raise $55,000 by January.  So far he’s raised $16,000.

Future plans include kicking off a Kickstarter campaign and continuing to raise funds through his network of friends, family, and colleagues.

To learn more and to donate follow this link.  Please enjoy the promo video below.

Be Careful Who You Work With: Woman in Tampa Sentenced to Confinement for Unlicensed Practice of Law

Posted: October 21st, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Originally posted on


USCIS successfully prosecutes unlicensed immigration attorney thanks to tip from the Central Florida Chapter of AILA.

TAMPA – The efforts of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services led to the successful sentencing of a Tampa-area woman on September 18 to six months confinement, six months home detention and three years of probation for falsely using official seals of the United States.  Maria Virginia Constantinou pleaded guilty on May 29 to falsely using the seal of the Department of Homeland Security to perpetuate her unlicensed practice of immigration law and defrauding dozens of victims to pay her “legal fees” to help them obtain lawful immigration status.

USCIS learned about Constantinou’s activities from a tip from the local American Immigration Lawyers Association. That tip was investigated by USCIS’ Fraud Detection and National Security Directorate and resulted in subsequent charges against Constantinou.  Tampa and Orlando FDNS worked with agents of Immigration and Customs Enforcement to bring the case to prosecution.

“We at USCIS are proud to have generated this case for successful prosecution,” said Kimberly Dean, Chief of FDNS in the Southeast Region. “Constantinou victimized immigrants for personal gain and misrepresented USCIS. We are committed to combatting deceptive practices to ensure the integrity of our nation’s immigration system.”

According to court documents, Constantinou presented herself to immigrants in the Tampa Bay and Orlando areas as an attorney who could assist them with immigration proceedings with the U.S. government. In reality, Constantinou is not a licensed attorney.

Constantinou accepted payment from her victims based on the false statement that she would submit immigration paperwork for them. Constantinou would then produce documents that appeared to be from USCIS to the victims to make them believe she had submitted paperwork on their behalf. These documents were false and contained false seals of the United States. Constantinou never submitted paperwork to USCIS on behalf of her victims.

USCIS launched an initiative to combat the Unauthorized Practice of Immigration Law with the goal of equipping applicants, legal service providers and community-based organizations with the knowledge and tools they need to detect and protect themselves from dishonest practices. Visit for more information.

Victoria Jaensch Karins is the current president of the Central Florida Chapter of AILA. For more information regarding this release please contact her via telephone: 941-366-9841.

Ten cuidado con quién trabaja

Condenan a una mujer quien ejercía la ley de inmigración sin licencia a seis meses de reclusión.

Originalmente publicado en


USCIS, con la ayuda del capítulo de la Florida Central de la Asociación Americana de Abogados de Inmigración (AILA) procesa con éxito a una mujer quien ejercía la ley de inmigración sin licencia.

TAMPA – Los esfuerzos de los Servicios de Ciudadanía e Inmigración de EE.UU. (USCIS) llevó a la condena el 18 de septiembre a una mujer del área de Tampa.  Está condenada a seis meses de reclusión, seis meses de arresto domiciliario y tres años de libertad condicional por uso falso de sellos oficiales de los Estados Unidos.  Maria Virginia Constantinou se declaró culpable el 29 de mayo al uso falso del sello del Departamento de Seguridad Nacional para perpetuar la práctica no autorizada de la ley de inmigración y al estafar decenas de víctimas quienes le pagaron “gastos legales.”

USCIS aprendió sobre las actividades de Constantinou por un informe del capítulo de la Florida Central de AILA.  La investigación por el USCIS dio lugar a las siguientes cargas contra Constantinou.  Los Departementos Federales de Seguridad Nacional (FDNS) de Tampa y Orlando trabajaron con agentes de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas (ICE) para llevar el caso al juicio.

“Nosotros en USCIS sentimos orgullosos de haber generado este caso para su enjuiciamiento exitoso”, dijo Kimberly Dean , Jefe de FDNS de la Región Sudeste.  “Constantinou perjudicó a inmigrantes para beneficiarse personalmente y tergiversó a USCIS.  Estamos comprometidos con la lucha contra las prácticas engañosas para asegurar la integridad del sistema de inmigración de nuestra nación”.

Constantinou se presentaba a los inmigrantes en la Bahía de Tampa y Orlando como abogada que les podría ayudar en los procedimientos de inmigración con el gobierno de EE.UU.  En realidad, Constantinou no es un abogado con licencia.

Constantinou aceptaba el pago de sus víctimas basándose en la falsa afirmación de que iba a presentar documentos a inmigración en sus nombres.  Constantinou entonces producía documentos que parecían ser de USCIS para hacerles creer a sus víctimas de que los había presentado. Estos documentos eran falsos y contenían falsos sellos de los Estados Unidos.  Constantinou nunca presentó documentación al USCIS.

USCIS puso en marcha una iniciativa para combatir el ejercicio no autorizado de la ley de inmigración con el objetivo de dotar a los solicitantes, proveedores de servicios legales y de las organizaciones basadas en la comunidad con el conocimiento y las herramientas necesarias para detectar y protegerse de las prácticas deshonestas.  Visite para más información.

Victoria Jaensch Karins es el actual presidente del Capítulo de la Florida Central de AILA.  Para obtener más información acerca del acontecimiento, por favor póngase en contacto con ella a través del teléfono : 941-366-9841.