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Construction Firms Seek More Workers from Abroad

Posted: September 9th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Employer & Student Visas, Immigration Reform, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment »

Facing an acute labor shortage, big firms are lobbying to lift caps on foreign construction workers.

Source: http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20130904/ARTICLE/130909855/2107/BUSINESS?Title=Growing-labor-shortage-worries-construction-firms

A national survey of construction firms found 74 percent were having problems finding qualified workers amid growing labor shortages in the industry.

The survey by Associated General Contractors of America comes as similar concerns have been raised among builders in Southwest Florida, with the new homes market ramping up and a tight inventory of existing homes.

In the Sunshine State, 80 percent of respondents told the AGC that they were having trouble filling key construction jobs.  Carpenters, laborers and iron workers were the most sought after positions.  The AGC said that builders nationwide are concerned that the problem is going to get worse.  “We need to take short- and long-term steps to make sure there are enough workers to meet future demand and avoid the costly construction delays that would come with labor shortages,” said Stephen Sandherr, the trade organization’s chief executive.
 
Some of the survey’s findings:
  • Seventy-four percent of the 700 responding firms nationwide said the jobs that were most difficult to fill were carpenters, equipment operators and laborers.
  • Fifty-three percent said they were also having a difficult time finding project supervisors, estimators and engineers.
  • Eighty-six percent of respondents said they expect it will remain difficult or get harder to find qualified craft workers while 72 percent say the market for professional positions will remain difficult or get worse.

To deal with the situation, 48 percent of responding firms said they are mentoring future craft workers while 38 percent are participating in career fairs and 33 percent are supporting high school-level construction skills academies.

Forty-seven percent said they are offering internships for construction professionals.

Looking to veterans

There was a 70 percent uptick in new home construction activity in Sarasota and Manatee counties this summer, but the industry is now running 50 percent below its employment peak in 2006, state records show.

As of July, construction accounted for 15,100 jobs in the two counties.

Area home builders have found at least one potential answer to the shortage: Military veterans.

The Home Builders Association Manatee-Sarasota and Suncoast Workforce, an entity that operates three Jobs Etc. employment center in the region, have crafted a pilot program aimed at alleviating the problem and providing jobs for vets, who sometimes struggle with unemployment.

Florida has an estimated 744,000 veterans in its labor force. Suncoast Workforce, meanwhile, has seen the number of veterans seeking help in Sarasota and Manatee counties rise 40 percent over the last two years, with about 1,900 now in the system looking for work.

New incentives provided by Congress in late 2011 could help homebuilders hire more vets. The IRS-guided VOW Hire Heroes Act extends tax breaks of $2,400 to employers who hire a veteran who has been jobless for a month, $5,600 for those unemployed at least six months and $9,600 for veterans who have been out of work six months or more and have a service-related disability.

The incentives can increase if the vet is also receiving some type of government assistance.

If builders have to train the new hires, the federal government also will help pick up the tab, paying half of the trainees’ paycheck for up to six months.

Caps

To deal with the issue at a national level, Sandherr, the AGC chief executive, is urging Congress to “jettison arbitrary caps” on construction workers that were included in immigration reform the U.S. Senate passed this year.

“Lifting those restrictions will go a long way to ensuring construction jobs left vacant by domestic labor shortages go to workers who are in the country legally,” he said.

The CEO also is urging local officials to “do more to ensure public school students have an opportunity to participate in programs that teach skills like construction.”

His organization’s survey, conducted in July and August, included nearly 700 construction firms, including Florida.


Guest Post: Do Investor Visa Petitions Require Business Plans?

Posted: August 22nd, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Investor Visas | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

The source of this information is E-Council, Inc: http://ecouncilinc.com/

e-Council Inc.com’s team of licensed professionals designs business plans for business owners and entrepreneurs seeking U.S. visas, establishing U.S. operations, seeking investors and/or expanding their businessesall at the right price. Our team is comprised of attorneys, MBA’s, CPA’s, PhD’s and other professionals that know what USCIS wants and we know how to deliver!  We have a stellar success rate and pride ourselves on consistently high-quality work.  

Lauren Cohen, Founder and President of eCouncil Inc.com, is an attorney licensed in both the U.S. and Canada and an active AILA member and speaker.  Having immigrated from Canada, Lauren has first-hand knowledge of the visa process.  She developed e-Council Inc.com to focus on designing professional Business Plans for all types of business visas, ranging from E-1 and E-2 to H-1B and L-1A, with a special focus on EB-5 projects for direct investments and regional centers. e-Council Inc.com not only creates the right business plans to complement visa applications, but also works closely with business owners to develop their business models and strategies in the process.

E-2 and EB-5 Investor Visas Resources

Whether required or not, Investor Visa Petitions are all incomplete and risk a Request for Evidence (RFE) or, even worse, a denial without a Business Plan.  A Business Plan provides supporting evidence necessary for USCIS or the Consular Officer to determine if the business is viable, has a likely chance of success, will contribute to the U.S. economy in a meaningful way, and if the beneficiary(ies), employer(s) and/or the business itself satisfy the specific requirements of the applicable Visa.  Therefore, even though not specifically mandated, business Visa petitions benefit tremendously from a professional Business Plan that demonstrates and details the business model, structure, and goals.  As noted, without a Business Plan, the Visa risks processing delays due to Requests for Evidence that are likely to be issued, or denials which are extremely challenging and costly to overcome.

EB-5 Visas

An EB-5 petition is the only Visa petition to expressly require a Business Plan.  USCIS, through the body of laws regulating business immigration to the U.S., further requires proof of job creation for an EB-5 Visa petition, which is to be evidenced in the mandated Business Plan.  As stated:

The job creation analysis for each economic activity must be supported by a copy of a Business Plan for an actual or exemplar capital investment project for that category.  Note: A Business Plan provided in support of a regional center application should contain sufficient detail to provide valid and reasoned inputs into the economic forecasting tools and must demonstrate that the proposed project is feasible under the current market and economic conditions.  The form of the EB-5 investment from the commercial enterprise into the job-creating project (equity, loan, or some other financial arrangement) should be identified.

The Business Plan should also identify any and all fees profits, surcharges, or other like remittances that will be paid to the regional center or any of its principals or agents through EB-5 capital investment activities.  (Department of Homeland Security, USCIS, OMB No. 1615-0061, Instructions for Form I-924, Application for Regional Center Under the Immigrant Investor Pilot Program, at p. 2.)

In the Regional Center context, a Business Plan is used to support, “in verifiable detail,” that the EB-5 investment for the new business enterprise will not be in conflict with the Regional Center’s Business Plan.  Notably, “When we approve a regional center, we acknowledge that the econometric models and Business Plans appear to be feasible and that jobs should be directly or indirectly created through investment in the approved industry categories.”  (United States Citizenship & Immigration Services Webpage, EB-5 Regional Centers, located at http://www.uscis.gov/.)

In 1998, the Associate Commissioner made a determination in the case of In re Ho.  This decision was and continues to be significant, explicitly detailing that EB-5’s require “a comprehensive Business Plan” (emphasis in original) that should contain the following elements:

1. a description of the business,
2. the business structure,
3. a marketing plan with target market analysis,
4. personnel experience,
5. a competitive analysis,
6. required licenses and permits,
7. staffing timetable for hiring, job descriptions, and
8. a budget and financial projections.

Significantly, it was noted that: “Most importantly, the Business Plan must be credible.”  (In re Ho, at p 213 – commonly referred to as MATTER OF HO).  Thus, the credibility of the Business Plan has become the pivotal factor, and EB-5 professionals are generally cognizant of this fact and will not prepare or submit Business Plans that they do not deem to be credible on their face.

This Matter of Ho decision set the standard for all future EB-5 Business Plans, and remains for the most part intact, with minor modifications and variations in interpretation depending on the specifics of the case and the type of EB-5 (ie: direct investment vs. regional center project).  Drafting an all-encompassing Business Plan is a complicated, time-consuming process that requires extensive research, industry marketing information, cognizance of the business structure and model, and an understanding of the key factors and evidence sought by USCIS.  While the business owner is often the best person to provide information about the business, (s)he is often constrained by time, lack of writing talent, and an absence of understanding of the Visa petition process and the requisite components of an EB=5 Business Plan.  Thus, the most prudent step that those pursing the EB-5 route can take is to retain a professional team to write the Business Plan incorporating the information supplied them in compliance with the requirements.

E-1, E-2 and L-1 Visas

E-2 and EB-5 Investor Visas

A Business Plan is equally critical to all non-immigrant business Visa petitions.  Increasingly, the reviewing agencies submit Requests for Evidence asking for a comprehensive Business Plan as support for the feasibility of the business and its contribution to the U.S. economy.  More often than not, Business Plans prepared by the petitioner are similarly kicked back as falling short.

In an E-Visa context, demonstrating that the investment (E-2) or trade (E-1) will be substantial or sufficient to satisfy the applicable treaty standards while showing that a successful business is planned is essential for approval.  What better way to show that the trade between the treaty countries (the U.S. and the home country of the beneficiary) is sufficient to meet the E-1 Visa requirements, or that the investment amount is “not marginal” so as to satisfy the E-2 Visa’s “substantial investment” threshold, than through a professionally-written Business Plan.

Similarly, establishing the intercompany transferee’s executive/managerial role in both the foreign country and proposed role in the U.S. is essential to satisfy the L-1A Visa requirements, among a growing list of other L-1A criteria that is changing on an almost-daily basis.  Proving that an intercompany transferee for an L-1B Visa has specialized knowledge and clearly delineating that knowledge is crucial for a successful petition in this area.  In both cases, a detailed analysis of the proposed beneficiary’s background and intended role with the petitioning company will offer evidentiary support that the beneficiary has specialized knowledge or is suited for an executive or supervisory position in applicable situations.

A professional Business Plan will not only include the nature of the business and the business model, the business’s mission, goals and objectives and a general marketing plan, but also details the structure of the business, its personnel, and the financial projections for the business. It will also outline how the business will positively impact the U.S. economy from various perspectives, and often will include a variety of charts, graphs and visuals so as to increase the appeal to the reviewing officials.  Outlining the nuts and bolts of the specific business in question along with the start-up and reasonable, fact-based projections with explanatory assumptions will clarify to the USCIS the viability of the business and, if an E-2 Visa, the reasonableness and risk factor of the “substantial investment”.  The detail with which a Business Plan should be composed creates evidentiary proof of the necessary factors needed for application approval.

National Interest Waivers (NIW’s)

A National Interest Waiver (NIW) petition is a part of the EB-2 category of second preference, employment-based immigration which leads directly to a Green Card.  Normally, a permanent job offer and an approved labor certification are pre-requisites to filing an employment-based, second preference immigration petition.  However, the NIW petition requests that the labor certification requirement be waived for the sake of the “national interest of the United States”.  In an NIW case, the burden of proof is on the applicant to establish that exemption from the labor certification will be in the national interest of the U.S.

Because of the nature of NIW petitions, it is vitally important that the petitioner show detailed and tangible evidence of past valuable contributions by the petitioner.  This evidence can be documented by showing the petitioner’s successful role in past business or academic projects.  In such cases, a business plan outlining the petitioner’s past accomplishments as well as present and future goals that is organized in a manner to highlight the petitioner’s significant and unique contributions can be a persuasive tool to present to the USCIS examiner.  For example, a business plan can document, in a form that USCIS examiners are used to reading, that the petitioner has already turned around a business, improved the economy, and created jobs in a way that would be vital to national interests.  The more evidence that the petitioner can present in the NIW context, the better chance of a favorable ruling.  Retro-oriented business plans can be a valuable part of that evidence.

Proposed changes to immigration laws contained in the Senate bill passed this summer would create two new types of visas: the temporary X visa, for entrepreneurs who don’t plan on staying in the U.S. permanently, and the EB-6 visa, which can lead to residency.  In each case, visas are available to entrepreneurs who hit thresholds for investment capital raised, jobs created, and revenue earned.  The EB-6 visa petition would specifically require the submittal of a business plan, which we can assume will follow EB-5 business plan requirements relating to detail and mandated elements.  The proposed X visa has investment threshold and job creation requirements that are also well-suited to documentation through a business plan.

A Business Plan is generally a roadmap for the business, designed to pave the way to its short- and long-term success.  However, as is the case in a Visa petition, the Business Plan can also be used to tell the story, provide an explanation, and give evidence and even a record of past accomplishments to further support the application.  A Visa petition lacking a sound, well-composed, and analytical Business Plan will likely face challenges at every turn, and will almost certainly be delayed by the USCIS seeking further evidence.

To find out more about professional, well-researched, articulate, expository narrative Business Plans, crafted specifically to address USCIS’s concerns, contact e-Council Inc.com for further information at info@ecouncilinc.com.


Immigration Reform Update: Senator Rubio Urges Fellow Republicans to Act

Posted: August 15th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Deferred Action, Immigration Reform, National News | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Senator Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican and co-author of the immigration reform bill that the Senate passed in June, recently warned fellow Republicans in the House of the potential consequences of not acting on the CIR bill.

Immigration Reform Author Marco Rubio

Senator Rubio argued that if the Congress does not act on Comprehensive Immigration Reform then President Obama will use an executive order to legalize the undocumented.  The President’s has already used an executive order to grant deferred action to the DREAMers and legalization by executive order would build on that precedent.  An executive order would legalize 11 million undocumented without including any of the provisions that Republicans believe should go with immigration reform, such as border security advances and E-Verify.

“I believe that this president will be tempted, if nothing happens in Congress, he will be tempted to issue an executive order like he did for the DREAM Act kids a year ago, where he basically legalizes 11 million people by the sign of a pen.  Now, we won’t get an E-Verify, we won’t get any border security.  But he’ll legalize them,” Rubio said  on Tuesday.

“Unless we’re going to try to round up and deport 11 million people — something that not even the most vociferous opponent of the [Senate] bill proposed — then we are going to have to at some point address this issue,” Rubio said. “We can’t leave, in my mind, the way it is.  Because I think a year from now we could find ourselves with all 11 million people here legally under an executive order from the president, but no E-Verify, no more border security, no more border agents, none of the other reforms that we desperately need,” he continued.

To read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/08/marco-rubio-immigration-executive-order-95487.html#ixzz2bxU4M895

What do you think of Senator Rubio’s warning?  Let us know in the comments below.


Cuidado con los Taxes

Posted: July 16th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Fraude con los impuestos

Cuidado con el fraude

La semana pasada apareció en el Sarasota Herald Tribune un artículo sobre Fernando Torres, el contador culpable de entregar mas que 200 declaraciones de impuestos fraudulentes.  Queremos tomar esta oportunidad para avisarles que no se metan con el fraude.  La razón principal es que se perjudicaría la posibilidad de pedir la legalización.

Si la reforma migratoria pase, el camino a la legalización requerirá que los solicitantes presente sus declaraciones de impuestos y, si no los tengan bien, que paguen lo que deben en “back-taxes.”  El hecho de fraude supondría un délito y perjudicaría la aplicación entera.

Si usted espera un dia legalizarse haga las cosas bien.  En este pais no hay corto camino y las cosas tienen que ser claras.  Si usted ha cometido el fraude, corrigalo.

Y, en el futuro, busque un contador que le haran las cosas bien, que no intentaran cometir fruade.  Pregunte las preguntas importantes hasta que usted está cómodo con las resuestas.

Nosotros en Jaensch Immigration Law Firm estamos dispuestos a ayudarle encontrar un contador responsable y cuidadoso cuando lo necesite.


Manatee Community Federal Credit Union Announces New President, Sherod Halliburton

Posted: July 8th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

We would like to take this opportunity to congratulate Sherod Halliburton on his appointment to President of Manatee Community Federal Credit Union.  Jaensch Immigration Law Firm is working closely with MCFCU to enable those who may wish to apply for legalization under the potential new immigration reform may begin saving money in order to do so.  If Immigration Reform passes, applying for legalization would be expensive.  Applicants would have to pay government fees as well as back taxes.  The total amount is still uncertain but is estimated to be in the thousands of dollars per person.  Fortunately, MCFCU has developed a financial instrument that will allow those who qualify to begin saving money now.  For more information readers are welcome to contact Jaensch Immigration Law Firm (941) 366-9841 or MCFCU (941) 941-748-7704 ext. 103.

MCFCU President Sherod Halliburton

MCFCU President Sherod Halliburton

In the meantime we are including the press release announcement of Sherod’s appointment below:

Manatee Community Federal Credit Union announces the appointment of Sherod Halliburton to President effective July 1, 2013. He replaces the long standing President Cindy Barco who retired after thirty-five years of exemplary service.  Mr. Halliburton has been employed by MCFCU as Executive Vice President since February 2012.  Prior to that Mr. Halliburton served as the Executive Director for the Bradenton Central Community Redevelopment Agency (CCRA) for over seven years.

While at the Bradenton CCRA Halliburton was instrumental in launching three key economic development organizations – the Central Economic Development Center, the award winning CareerEdge Funders Collaborative, and Suncoast Community Capital. All three organizations have thrived and have filled very important gaps in economic and community development programming in Manatee and Sarasota Counties. Under Halliburton’s direction, CareerEdge was awarded the President’s Award from the Florida Redevelopment Association which celebrates the number one redevelopment project in the state of Florida.  More recently CareerEdge was honored with the Exemplary Collaborative Award from the National Fund for Workforce Solutions given to the top National Fund sites in the country.  “Mr. Halliburton has connections deeply rooted in the community and provides the credit union the ability to deliver financial services and programs that are much needed by our members”, said Vin Foderingham, MCFCU Chief Financial Officer and Board Member.  “The credit union has a great future ahead of it and with Sherod’s leadership there’s no doubt that we will reach another level of success.  We certainly thank Cindy Barco for her exemplary service over the years and wish her well in her retirement.”

Manatee Community Federal Credit Union was founded as Tropicana Employees Federal Credit Union in 1958. Halliburton’s relationship with MCFCU dates back to 2007 when he was the first non-Tropicana employee ever appointed to the board of directors where he served with distinction for five years.  Mr. Halliburton was instrumental in the transformation of MCFCU from exclusively serving Tropicana Employees into one of only three credit unions in Florida designated by the U.S. Treasury Department as a Community Development Financial Institution.  This designation recognizes MCFCU’s commitment to providing quality and specialized financial serves to underserved consumers throughout Manatee County.   “It’s evident that Sherod has a way with making positive changes with all that he undertakes. He has a proven track record as a result of his forward thinking and vision.  I am confident that within the credit union movement he will continue this pattern which can only enhance the lives of our MCFCU members, their families and our community,” says Cindy Barco, retiring MCFCU President.

Find out more about how Manatee Community Federal Credit Union and Jaensch Immigration Law Firm are working together to help Sarasota-Manatee residents prepare for the potential Comprehensive Immigration Reform.

How to Prepare for Immigration Reform (Spanish) from L. Michael Marquet


Preparate para la Reforma Migratoria

Posted: July 2nd, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , | No Comments »

Cesar Gomez da nuevo seminario sobre los cambios que vienen en la ley de inmigración.

Reforma Migratoria Seminario

Cesar Gomez Habla sobre la Reforma Migratoria

El senado paso reforma migratoria, todavía un proyecto de ley, el 27 de junio.  Significa un paso más en el proceso de apruebo de una gran reforma que, entre otras metas, crearía un camino hacía la legalización para las personas indocumentadas en este pais.

Una vez aprobada, mucha gente va a querer aplicar para la legalización.  Esto crearía filas y retrasos nunca vistos en el tramite de aplicaciones.  Por esta razón, los abogados de Jaensch Immigration Law Firm quieren que la comunidad este preparada lo antes posible para las oportunidades que esta reforma pueda crear.

Por eso se ha organizado una serie de seminarios que se están dando en los condados de Sarasota, Manatee y DeSoto entre companías, organizaciones sin fines de lucro, e iglesias.  El último seminario, de que se ve la foto arriba, se dio en las oficinas de Suncoast Community Capital en Bradenton.  Cesar Gomez, anterior director de la cámara de comercio hispana del golfo y abogado en Colombia, hablo de los posibles cambios en la ley de inmigración, como prepararse para ellos, y como empezar a ahorrar dinero para las multas e impuestos que uno tendra que pagar para legalizarse.

Los seminarios se dan con la participación de TVNet Group que incluye los periódicos “La Guia,” “7Dias,” y “Buen Vivir.”  Luis Baron, fundador de TVNet Group, ha puesto anuncios y artículos sobre estos seminarios en sus periódicos y le agradezemos su ayuda.

TVNet Media Group

TVNet Media Group

Nosotros de Jaensch Immigration Law Firm vamos a dar estos seminarios en varios lugares en Sarasota, Bradenton, Venice, y Arcadia en los meses vienen.  Si usted sabe alguien que puede usar esta información o quiere actuarse como anfitrión para un seminario, por favor, contáctenos: 941-366-9841.

Aprende como se puede empezar a prepararse ya para los posibles cambios en la ley de inmigración.

How to Prepare for Immigration Reform (Spanish) from L. Michael Marquet

 

 


Jaensch Immigration Law Firm Prepares for Immigration Reform

Posted: June 28th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm, National News | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Sarasota Immigration Attorneys Preparing for Increased Demand

Immigration Reform passed the Senate on Thursday, June 27 by a vote of 68-32.  It still has to go through committee and floor debate in the House of Representatives, reconciliation, and signing.  Nevertheless, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm is already preparing in case the bill becomes law.

Immigration Reform Author Marco Rubio

Senator Marco Rubio, member of the Gang of Eight, after the bill passed the Senate

Last year the firm established a Latin American Division, managed by Cesar Gomez, former director of the Gulf Coast Latin Chamber of Commerce, to expand ties and establish strategic partnerships with the local Latin American community.  What’s more, over the last 6 months the firm has doubled its office space and increased staff by 20% with further increases planned.

“Comprehensive Immigration Reform could change almost every aspect of the immigration system.  It would create many new opportunities, not only for undocumented immigrants, but for investors, students, and workers as well,” says P. Christopher Jaensch, managing attorney of Jaensch Immigration Law Firm.  “Such a sweeping change would create new demand for our services and we want to be ready to handle that,” he adds.

The firm began disseminating information about the bill the moment it appeared.  They created a new website that collects and displays the latest immigration reform news.  They embarked on an informational campaign using emails, social media, and news articles.  The campaign educates the Sarasota-Bradenton area about the possibilities that immigration reform would bring.

Members of the firm traveled to Washington in April before the bill had entered the Senate.  Victoria Jaensch Karins brought letters from Sarasota area employers and individual immigrants demonstrating the need for immigration reform.  Soon after the Gang of Eight unveiled the legislation and submitted it to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The firm is conducting bi-lingual seminars in Manatee and Sarasota Counties, as well as Arcadia, to explain the provisions of the bill.  They also created a fingerprint data collection center where individuals interested in obtaining information about their own criminal and immigration detention history can have their fingerprints taken and sent to the FBI for a records search. 

“It will be especially important for those who may wish to apply for legalization to demonstrate the absence of a criminal record,” says Mr. Jaensch, “and for that they need to have their fingerprints taken.”  He adds that in the past, “this could only be done through the local jail or police office.”

All those interested in learning the latest on the progress of immigration reform can do so on Jaensch Immigration Law Firm’s news blog, ImmigrationSarasota.com/ImmigrationReform.


New Fingerprinting Service Begins

Posted: June 24th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, Jaensch Immigration Law Firm | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Jaensch Immigration Law Firm Adds Fingerprinting Service to Increase Client Convenience

In our ongoing effort to better serve our clients Jaensch Immigration Law Firm recently acquired Fingerprint Equipment.  This will allow clients to have their fingerprints taken conveniently and privately without having to travel to another location.

Clients may need to have fingerprints taken for any number of reasons.  For those who may have criminal records, getting fingerprints is recommended in order to obtain their law enforcement record.  Those who may have entered without inspection should also get their fingerprints taken so that the details of their immigration history are known to them, and so that an immigration attorney can review their history with them, to help determine eligibility for potential benefits.

Getting fingerprints is most important for those who wish to begin preparing a case for the potential path to legalization.  Anyone who wishes to apply for legalization should know their full record with law enforcement, including from outside Sarasota County, before they apply.

We will be taking fingerprints in our annex, conveniently located across the parking lot.  We will submit the fingerprints to the FBI.  Clients do not have to use their personal address, we can use ours.  It takes 4-5 months to get the report back.

We hope that this new equipment becomes a useful and convenient way for any client who needs their fingerprints taken to do so quickly and privately.


Latest News on Immigration Reform, From Across the Web

Posted: June 20th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Immigration Reform, National News, Sarasota Immigrants | Tags: , , | No Comments »

CBO: Senate immigration bill would cut deficits by $200 billion over decade. “The immigration bill under consideration in the Senate would reduce federal deficits by nearly $200 billion over the next decade, and continue generating savings in the years beyond, even after millions of new citizens became eligible for health-care and welfare benefits, congressional budget analysts said Tuesday. The long-awaited report by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office marked a major victory for the bipartisan “Gang of Eight” senators who have spent months negotiating the details of the measure.” Lori Montgomery in The Washington Post.

Read: The CBO report.

…Here are the key numbers. “While the bill increases spending by $262 billion over 10 years, it increases revenue by $459 billion, for a deficit reduction of $197 billion in total. Additionally, it projects $690 billion in deficit reduction in the second decade of implementation, from 2024 to 2033. The reports predicts that the bill will add 10.4 million permanent U.S. residents and 1.6 million new temporary visa-holders, and reduce the undocumented immigrant population by 1.6 million.” Dylan Matthews in The Washington Post.

@petersuderman: CBO estimates that the immigration bill will cut deficits by $197b over 10 years. Basically: More legal labor=more revenue=lower deficits.

…It’s a free lunch, the CBO is saying. “This isn’t just a good CBO report. It’s a wildly good CBO report. They’re basically saying immigration reform is a free lunch: It cuts the deficit by growing the economy. It makes Americans better off and it makes immigrants better off. At a time when the U.S. economy desperately needs a bit of help, this bill, according to the CBO, helps. And politically, it forces opponents of the bill onto the ground they’re least comfortable occupying: They have to argue that immigration reform is bad for cultural or ethical reasons rather than economic ones.” Ezra Klein in The Washington Post.

@reihan: CBO analysis accounts for population increase, but not potential productivity gains. It also doesn’t account for technological risk.

2 amendments to immigration bill passed, 2 defeated. “Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.): The senator has several proposals regarding non-native children adopted by American parents, a longtime interest of hers. Under a 2000 law, children lawfully adopted by American parents are automatically granted citizenship. Landrieu’s amendment would extend those rights to children who turned 18 before the law was passed.” Ed O’Keefe in The Washington Post.

House panel approves enforcement-based immigration bill. “The House Judiciary Committee late Tuesday approved its first immigration bill, advancing on a party-line vote a proposal to boost interior enforcement and border security. After a day-long mark-up, the Republican-led panel cleared the SAFE Act on a 20-15 vote shortly before 11 p.m. It is one of several bills that Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) says the committee plans to send to the House floor in the coming weeks.” Russell Berman in The Hill.

@dylanmatt: The CBO report is a good reminder that the case against expanded immigration isn’t economic, it’s sociological.

Reid: Bill could pass Senate right now. “Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said the Gang of Eight’s immigration bill can pass the Senate in its current form, although he’s open to border security changes that don’t destroy the bill’s pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants…As Reid spoke to reporters on Tuesday afternoon, Republican senators like John Hoeven (N.D.) and Bob Corker (Tenn.) were working with some members of the Gang of Eight to craft a way to strengthen the bill’s border security measures while also not turning off Democrats.” Burgess Everett in Politico.

…And Reid is threatening to file cloture on immigration reform. “The Senate must speed ahead on its attempt to remake U.S. immigration policy, Majority Leader Harry Reid said Tuesday morning, threatening to file to cut off debate by Monday. Reid said the workload for the Senate will be heavier than usual and that if the Senate doesn’t get to work on agreement on tranches of amendment votes, it will find itself working on the weekend — a familiar threat from the Nevada Democrat. Reid hopes to finish the legislation before the July 4 recess.” Burgess Everett in Politico.

Boehner assures colleagues: No immigration bill without majority GOP support. “The fate of the sprawling immigration reform proposal winding its way through Congress may now be in the hands of some of the most conservative members of the Republican Party. House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said Tuesday that he will not advance any bill that did not have the support of a majority of the House GOP, which will mean engaging some of the proposal’s biggest detractors and harshest critics.” Ed O’Keefe in The Washington Post.

…And he says he’s not in favor of a comprehensive approach to immigration reform. “Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) said Tuesday that he will adhere to the “Hastert Rule” on immigration reform and denied claims that he is for a “comprehensive” solution. Boehner’s remarks seek to appease conservatives who have grown increasingly restless about where House Republicans are headed on the thorny matter.” Molly K. Hooper in The Hill.

Keeping undocumented immigrants off the dole is easier said than done. “[T]he conflicts over eligibility for Obamacare subsidies and Social Security/Medicare could be more intractable. The question of whether unauthorized immigrants should be able to get public money for health care, or get retirement money based on work they did while in the country illegally, isn’t a technical one. It’s a moral and ethical one on which those concerned primarily with the welfare of poor immigrants and those concerned primarily with ensuring that legal processes are fair and don’t reward certain behavior, are bound to disagree.” Dylan Matthews in The Washington Post.